Yellowfin Goby, Acanthogobius flavimanus (Temminck & Schlegel 1845)


Other Names: Japanese Goby, Oriental Goby, Yellow-finned Goby

Yellowfin Goby, Acanthogobius flavimanus. Source: Rudie H. Kuiter / Aquatic Photographics. License: All rights reserved

Summary:

Body relatively large, head moderately long, triangular in cross-section, eyes close together near top of head; mouth terminal, oblique, reaching almost to below middle of eye.

A brownish goby with darker mottling on the back and cheek, and a thin dark diagonal line from eye to rear margin of jaws. Midsides with 6-8 irregular darker blotches, and a dark round spot at the base of the tail. Upper part of pectoral-fin base with a short horizontal dark bar. Dorsal and caudal fin with fine speckled lines, pectoral  fins yellow.

Accidentally introduced to Australia and California when juveniles or larvae were transported in ship's ballast water which was released in ports of call.


Cite this page as:
Bray, D.J. & Gomon, M.F. 2017, Acanthogobius flavimanus in Fishes of Australia, accessed 18 Feb 2018, http://fishesofaustralia.net.au/Home/species/58

Yellowfin Goby, Acanthogobius flavimanus (Temminck & Schlegel 1845)

More Info


Distribution

Native to temperate coastal waters of Japan, Korea and China. In Australia, recorded from New South Wales and Victoria. Builds burrows on muddy bottoms in shallow estuaries, harbours and in the lower reaches of rivers and streams, often far upstream.

The Yellowfin Goby was accidentally introduced to Australia and California when larvae or juveniles were transported in ballast water in ships and the water was released in ports of call. To prevent further introductions, ships heading to Australia must now release their ballast water far offshore.

Following its initial discovery in Sydney Harbour in 1971, the Yellowfin Goby spread up and down the NSW coast. Populations were discovered in the Hunter River system, the Hawkesbury River system, Botany Bay and the Georges River.

In 1990, it was discovered in Port Phillip Bay and was subsequently found in large numbers in the western part of the Bay and in the lower reaches of the Yarra River. In 2007, it was also found in the Tarwin River Estuary in Victoria.

The Yellowfin Goby species is now considered to be rare in Australia.

Features

Dorsal fin VIII-IX, I, 12-14; Anal fin I, 11; Pectoral fin 21; Pelvic fin I, 5; Caudal fin (segmented rays) 17.

Size

To 29 cm TL, 25 cm SL.

Colour

Brownish with darker mottling on the back and cheek and a thin dark diagonal line from eye to rear margin of jaws.

Midsides with 6-8 irregular darker blotches, and a dark round spot at the base of the tail. Upper part of pectoral-fin base with a short horizontal dark bar. Dorsal and caudal fin with fine speckled lines, pectoral  fins yellow.

Feeding

Carnivore - feeds on benthic invertebrates.

Biology

The sexes are separate and females spawn during winter and spring, and lay their demersal eggs into a nest.

Etymology

The species name flavimanus is Latin meaning "yellow fin".

Species Citation

Gobius flavimanus Temminck & Schlegel 1845, Fauna Japonica, Parts 7-9: 141, Pl. 74 (fig. 1)

Type locality: River mouths of Nagasaki Bay, Japan

Author

Bray, D.J. & Gomon, M.F. 2017

Yellowfin Goby, Acanthogobius flavimanus (Temminck & Schlegel 1845)

References


Arthington, A.H. & F. McKenzie. 1997. Review of impacts of displaced/introduced fauna associated with inland waters. Australia: State of the Environment Technical Paper Series (Inland waters), Department of the Environment, Canberra (Australia). 69 pp.

Bell, J., Steffe, A.S. & Talbot, R.B. 1987. The oriental goby, Acanthogobius flavimanus, colonizes a third estuary in New South Wales, Australia. Japanese Journal of Ichthyology 34(2): 227-230.

Carlton, J.T. 1985. Transoceanic and interoceanic dispersal of coastal marine organisms: the biology of ballast water. Oceanogr. Mar. Biol. 23: 313-371.

Cunningham, G.M. 1998. The temporal and spatial distribution of the larvae of three exotic and two native species of gobies in Port Phillip Bay, Victoria. Unpublished Honours Thesis, the University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria.

Dôtu, Y. & S. Mito. 1955. On the breeding habits, larvae and young of a goby, Acanthogobius flavimanus (Temminck et Schlegel). Jap. J. Ichthyol. 4(4/5): 152-161.

Furlani, D.M. 1996. A guide to the introduced marine species in Australian waters. CRIMP Technical Report No. 5, CSIRO Division of Marine Research, Hobart, Tasmania.

Hirase, S., Chambers, S., Hassell, K., Crew, M., Pettigrove, V., Soyano, K., Nagae, M. & Iwasaki, W. 2017. Phylogeography of the yellowfin goby Acanthogobius flavimanus in native and non-native distributions. Marine Biology 164: 106. doi:10.1007/s00227-017-3137-6 Abstract

Hobday, D.K., Offiver, R.A. & Parry, G.D. 1999. Changes to demersal fish communties in Port Phillip Bay, Australia, over two decades, 1970-91. Marine and Freshwater Research 50: 397-407.

Hoese, D.F. 1973. The introduction of the gobiid fishes Acanthogobius flavimanus and Tridentiger trigonocephalus into Australia. Koolewong 2(3): 3-5.

Hoese, D.F. & Larson, H.K. 1994. Family Gobiidae. pp. 781-810, figs 690-714 in Gomon, M.F., Glover, C.J.M. & Kuiter, R.H (eds). The Fishes of Australia's South Coast. Adelaide : State Printer 992 pp. 810 figs

Hoese, D.F. & Larson, H.K. 2008. Family Gobiidae (pp. 749-773) in Gomon. M.F., Bray, D.J. & Kuiter, R.H (eds). Fishes of Australia's Southern Coast. Sydney : Reed New Holland 928 pp.

Lockett, M.M. & Gomon, M.F. 1999. Occurrence and distribution of exotic fishes in Port Phillip Bay. In: Hewitt, C.L., Campbell, M.L., Thresher, R.E. and Martin, R.B. (eds) Marine Biological Invasions of Port Phillip Bay, Victoria, CRIMP Technical Report No. 20, CSIRO Marine Research, Hobart, Australia.

Middleton, M.J. 1982. The oriental goby, Acanthogobius flavimanus, an introduced fish in the coastal waters of New South Wales. Journal of Fish Biology 21(5): 513-523

Neilson, M.E. & Wilson Jr, R.R. 2005. mtDNA singletons as evidence of a post-invasion genetic bottleneck in the yellowfin goby Acanthogobius flavimanus from San Francisco Bay, California. Marine Ecology Progress Series 296: 197-208

Parry, G.D., Hobday, D.K., Currie, D.R., Officer, R.A. & Gason, A.S. 1995. The distribution, abundance and diets of demersal fish in Port Phillip Bay, CSIRO Port Phillip Bay Environmental Study, Technical Report 21, CSIRO, Hobart, Tasmania, pp. 119.

Pollard, D.A. 1989. Introduced marine and estuarine fishes in Australia. Bureau of Rural Resources Proceedings 8: 47-49.

Pollard, D.A. & Hutchings, P.A. 1990. A review of exotic marine organisms introduced to the Australian region. I. Fishes. Asian Fisheries Science 3(303): 205-221.

Quick Facts


CAAB Code:37428030

Biology:Lives in burrows

Habitat:Muddy bottoms, seagrass

Max Size:To 29 cm

Native:Introduced

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